Anders Olsson

Anders Olsson is a lecturer, teacher and founder of the Conscious Breathing concept and the author of Conscious Breathing. After living most of his life with a ”hurricane of thoughts” bouncing back and forth in is head, Anders was fortunate enough to come across tools that have helped him relax and find his inner calm. The most powerful of these tools has undoubtedly been to improve his breathing habits, which made Anders decide to become the worlds most prominent expert in breathing. This is now more than 10 years ago and since then he has helped tens of thousands of people to a better health and improved quality of life. Read more about Anders here >>

Discover the Power of Your Breath with Anders Olsson | John Douillard’s LifeSpa

Here is an interview Dr. John Douillard, DC, CAP, did with me. When I started to delve into the world of breathing more than 10 years ago, one of the first books I read was his book “Body, Mind, and Sport: The Mind-Body Guide to Lifelong Health, Fitness, and Your Personal Best“. In the book …

Discover the Power of Your Breath with Anders Olsson | John Douillard’s LifeSpa Read More »

Shut your mouth and Save Your Life

Man is known to be the most perfectly constructed of all the animals, and consequently he can endure more: he can out-travel the Horse, the Dog, the Ox or any other animal; he can fast longer; his natural life is said to be ‘threescore and ten years,’ while its real average length, in civilized communities, is but half equal to that of the brutes whose natural term is not one-third as long!

When “Crying It Out” Doesn’t Work

The oxidative stress, or the rate of living, theory of ageing suggests that a lower metabolic rate means longer life span and higher metabolic rate means a shorter life span, i.e. “live fast, die young”. This holds in most cases, since larger animals in general have a low metabolic rate and tend to live longer than smaller animals with a corresponding higher metabolic rate. An elephant for example can live up to 80 years. Since it has a slow metabolism, the elephant heart beats roughly the same number of beats as the heart of a mouse. The mouse however, with a much faster metabolism, “uses up” it’s heart beats in only 2-3 years.

However, since there are many exceptions from the “live fast, die young”-theory it tells us that it is incomplete. This article looks at ageing from a breathing perspective and suggest that the tolerance for carbon dioxide is a major factor determining the life span.

The Treatment of Pneumonia by Inhalation of Carbon Dioxide

The oxidative stress, or the rate of living, theory of ageing suggests that a lower metabolic rate means longer life span and higher metabolic rate means a shorter life span, i.e. “live fast, die young”. This holds in most cases, since larger animals in general have a low metabolic rate and tend to live longer than smaller animals with a corresponding higher metabolic rate. An elephant for example can live up to 80 years. Since it has a slow metabolism, the elephant heart beats roughly the same number of beats as the heart of a mouse. The mouse however, with a much faster metabolism, “uses up” it’s heart beats in only 2-3 years.

However, since there are many exceptions from the “live fast, die young”-theory it tells us that it is incomplete. This article looks at ageing from a breathing perspective and suggest that the tolerance for carbon dioxide is a major factor determining the life span.

Konstantin Buteyko: Interview

The oxidative stress, or the rate of living, theory of ageing suggests that a lower metabolic rate means longer life span and higher metabolic rate means a shorter life span, i.e. “live fast, die young”. This holds in most cases, since larger animals in general have a low metabolic rate and tend to live longer than smaller animals with a corresponding higher metabolic rate. An elephant for example can live up to 80 years. Since it has a slow metabolism, the elephant heart beats roughly the same number of beats as the heart of a mouse. The mouse however, with a much faster metabolism, “uses up” it’s heart beats in only 2-3 years.

However, since there are many exceptions from the “live fast, die young”-theory it tells us that it is incomplete. This article looks at ageing from a breathing perspective and suggest that the tolerance for carbon dioxide is a major factor determining the life span.

Konstantin Buteyko: The Discovery

The oxidative stress, or the rate of living, theory of ageing suggests that a lower metabolic rate means longer life span and higher metabolic rate means a shorter life span, i.e. “live fast, die young”. This holds in most cases, since larger animals in general have a low metabolic rate and tend to live longer than smaller animals with a corresponding higher metabolic rate. An elephant for example can live up to 80 years. Since it has a slow metabolism, the elephant heart beats roughly the same number of beats as the heart of a mouse. The mouse however, with a much faster metabolism, “uses up” it’s heart beats in only 2-3 years.

However, since there are many exceptions from the “live fast, die young”-theory it tells us that it is incomplete. This article looks at ageing from a breathing perspective and suggest that the tolerance for carbon dioxide is a major factor determining the life span.

John B West: Lectures of Respiratory Physiology

The oxidative stress, or the rate of living, theory of ageing suggests that a lower metabolic rate means longer life span and higher metabolic rate means a shorter life span, i.e. “live fast, die young”. This holds in most cases, since larger animals in general have a low metabolic rate and tend to live longer than smaller animals with a corresponding higher metabolic rate. An elephant for example can live up to 80 years. Since it has a slow metabolism, the elephant heart beats roughly the same number of beats as the heart of a mouse. The mouse however, with a much faster metabolism, “uses up” it’s heart beats in only 2-3 years.

However, since there are many exceptions from the “live fast, die young”-theory it tells us that it is incomplete. This article looks at ageing from a breathing perspective and suggest that the tolerance for carbon dioxide is a major factor determining the life span.

John B West: Lectures of Respiratory Physiology – Description

The oxidative stress, or the rate of living, theory of ageing suggests that a lower metabolic rate means longer life span and higher metabolic rate means a shorter life span, i.e. “live fast, die young”. This holds in most cases, since larger animals in general have a low metabolic rate and tend to live longer than smaller animals with a corresponding higher metabolic rate. An elephant for example can live up to 80 years. Since it has a slow metabolism, the elephant heart beats roughly the same number of beats as the heart of a mouse. The mouse however, with a much faster metabolism, “uses up” it’s heart beats in only 2-3 years.

However, since there are many exceptions from the “live fast, die young”-theory it tells us that it is incomplete. This article looks at ageing from a breathing perspective and suggest that the tolerance for carbon dioxide is a major factor determining the life span.

Yandell Henderson: Biography

The oxidative stress, or the rate of living, theory of ageing suggests that a lower metabolic rate means longer life span and higher metabolic rate means a shorter life span, i.e. “live fast, die young”. This holds in most cases, since larger animals in general have a low metabolic rate and tend to live longer than smaller animals with a corresponding higher metabolic rate. An elephant for example can live up to 80 years. Since it has a slow metabolism, the elephant heart beats roughly the same number of beats as the heart of a mouse. The mouse however, with a much faster metabolism, “uses up” it’s heart beats in only 2-3 years.

However, since there are many exceptions from the “live fast, die young”-theory it tells us that it is incomplete. This article looks at ageing from a breathing perspective and suggest that the tolerance for carbon dioxide is a major factor determining the life span.

Yandell Henderson: Carbon Dioxide

The oxidative stress, or the rate of living, theory of ageing suggests that a lower metabolic rate means longer life span and higher metabolic rate means a shorter life span, i.e. “live fast, die young”. This holds in most cases, since larger animals in general have a low metabolic rate and tend to live longer than smaller animals with a corresponding higher metabolic rate. An elephant for example can live up to 80 years. Since it has a slow metabolism, the elephant heart beats roughly the same number of beats as the heart of a mouse. The mouse however, with a much faster metabolism, “uses up” it’s heart beats in only 2-3 years.

However, since there are many exceptions from the “live fast, die young”-theory it tells us that it is incomplete. This article looks at ageing from a breathing perspective and suggest that the tolerance for carbon dioxide is a major factor determining the life span.

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